Relationship between autonomic cardiovascular control and obstructive sleep apnoea in persons with spinal cord injury: a retrospective study

AuthorsFang, X.
Goh, M.Y.
O'Callaghan, C.
Berlowitz, D.
TypeJournal Article (Original Research)
JournalSpinal Cord Series and Cases
PubMed ID29619250
Year of Publication2018
URLhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29619250
DOI/10.1038/s41394-018-0062-y
Download s41394-018-0062-y.pdf (527.5 KB)
AbstractStudy design: Retrospective study. Objective: To determine if there is an association between obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and blood pressure (BP) pattern or heart rate variability (HRV) in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Setting: A state-based spinal cord service in Victoria, Australia. Methods: We identified 42 subjects who had ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) within 6 months of a diagnostic sleep study at Austin Hospital between 2009 and 2014. Markers for autonomic function, including circadian BP pattern and HRV were extracted from the ABPM study database. Apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI), arousals/hour and oxygen desaturation index were extracted from the sleep study database. Subjects with a nocturnal systolic BP dipping more than 10% of daytime value were defined as dippers, between 10 and 0% were non-dippers and those with a higher night than day systolic BP were reverse dippers. Severity of OSA is classified as non-OSA (AHI < 5), mild (AHI 5-15), moderate (AHI 15-30) and severe (AHI > 30). Results: Subjects (n = 42) were predominantly male (85.7%), aged 44 +/- 15.4 (mean +/- SD), with a BMI of 24.4 +/- 5.7 (mean +/- SD) and mainly tetraplegic (92.9%). There was no difference in AHI, oxygen desaturation index or arousals/hour between dippers, non-dippers and reverse dippers. None of the HRV parameters differed between dippers, non-dippers and reverse dippers. No differences were found in 24 h, night-time, daytime or nocturnal dip in BP between subjects with non-OSA, mild, moderate and severe OSA. Conclusion: We found no relationship between BP pattern or HRV and the severity of OSA in persons with SCI.

http://www.ibas.org.au/what-we-do/publications/3872956


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