Respiratory Research

Respiratory disorders are common in the Australian community. One common disorder is asthma, which affects around 10% of the population. Another common disorder is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which affects between 10-20% of people over the age of 40 – around 2.1 million Australians at any one time. Lung cancer is the fourth most commonly diagnosed cancer and the most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women.

Other conditions that IBAS is actively involved in researching include fibrotic lung diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis, mesothelioma and bronchiectasis.

All respiratory disorders have a range of negative health outcomes for those affected. Given how essential breathing is to everything we do, the specific symptoms of the condition can be both debilitating and frightening. The ongoing effects of a respiratory illness can lead to frequent hospitalisations and affects people’s ability to work and enjoy their lives.

Respiratory diseases burden people experiencing the disease as well as their family, friends and carers. In addition, respiratory disease places a financial burden on the Australian community. These costs include health and hospital costs as well as lost productivity.

Since the Institute was established in 2000, our team has led successful research in a number of key areas including:

  • Oxygen therapy – when it is needed and most useful
  • The benefits of exercise training (pulmonary rehabilitation) in a variety of conditions, including lung cancer
  • Novel treatments for alleviating breathlessness
  • The use of telemedicine to deliver treatments

IBAS also runs clinical trials that are sponsored by pharmaceutical companies – these trials can provide individuals with access to new treatments as well as benefitting society by advancing our knowledge of treatments.

To see current IBAS respiratory projects, click here.

As breathing and sleep disorders often overlap, our research into breathing and sleep disorders are interlinked. To find out more about our sleep research, click here.

More information on respiratory disorders can be found at the following websites:

  • Asthma – National Asthma Council (www.nationalasthma.org.au) or Asthma Australia (www.asthmaaustralia.org.au)
  • Other conditions – Lung Foundation Australia (www.lungfoundation.com.au)
If you have concerns about yours or someone else’s breathing, please either:
  • Ring 000 (Australia) for an ambulance if the problem is acute and you or someone else is having trouble breathing
  • Make an appointment with your GP (General Practitioner / Local Doctor) or, if you have one, your respiratory specialist.
  • Ring Nurse on Call (1300 60 60 24) if the problem is not serious but you would like advice and support

 

 

 



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