The effects of experimental sleep fragmentation and sleep deprivation on the response of the genioglossus muscle to inspiratory resistive loads.

AuthorsCori, J.M.
Nicholas, C.L.
Avraam, J.
Lee, V.V.
Schembri, R.
Jackson, M.L.
Jordan, A.S.
TypeJournal Article (Original Research)
JournalJournal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
PubMed ID29734983
Year of Publication2018
URLhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29734983
DOI/10.5664/jcsm.7090
AbstractSTUDY OBJECTIVES: Poor upper airway dilator muscle function may contribute to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Sleep deprivation reduces dilator muscle responsiveness, but sleep fragmentation, which is most characteristic of OSA, has not been assessed. This study compared the effects of sleep deprivation and fragmentation on dilator muscle responsiveness during wakefulness. METHODS: Twenty-four healthy individuals (10 female) participated in two consecutive overnight polysomnography (PSG) sessions. The first was an adaptation PSG of normal sleep. The second was an experimental PSG, where participants were allocated to groups of either normal sleep, no sleep, or fragmented sleep. Inspiratory resistive loading assessment occurred the morning following each PSG. Four 10 cmH2O and four 20 cmH2O loads were presented in random order for 60 seconds while participants were awake and supine. Sleep (electroencephalogram, electrooculogram, electromyogram [EMG]), intramuscular genioglossus activity (EMGGG), and ventilation were measured throughout the loading sessions. RESULTS: Five controls, seven sleep deprivation participants, and seven sleep fragmentation participants provided data. Contrary to expectations, neither EMGGG nor ventilation showed significant interaction effects (group x session x load) during resistive loading. There was a main effect of load, with peak EMGGG (mean % max +/- standard error) significantly higher for the 20 cmH2O load (4.1 +/- 0.6) than the 10 cmH2O load (3.3 +/- 0.6) across both sessions and all groups. Similar results were observed for peak inspiratory flow, duty cycle, and mask pressure. CONCLUSIONS: Upper airway function was not affected by 1 night of no sleep or poor-quality sleep. This raises doubt as to whether fragmented sleep in OSA increases disorder severity via reduced upper airway dilator responses.

http://www.ibas.org.au/what-we-do/publications/3872950


< More publications



SHiQ - COSAQSHIQ - COSAQ

Each year in Australia 260 people sustain a SCI, with over half losing full function in their arms and legs (quadriplegia). In addition to the primary disability, there is a very high rate of Obstructive...

Notch monitoring in sleepNOTCH MONITORING IN SLEEP

Sleep apnea is a condition where breathing is abnormal during sleep. There are two main forms of sleep apnea: obstructive and central. For obstructive sleep apnea, breathing is reduced because the airway...

IBAS Director Anna Burke unveiling of her portrait at Canberra's Parliament HouseIBAS DIRECTOR ANNA BURKE UNVEILING OF HER PORTRAIT AT CANBERRA'S PARLIAMENT HOUSE

Anna Burke had barely got into the swing of her speech at the unveiling of her portrait at Canberra's Parliament House when the ringing of bells caused half her audience to hurry away

Thunderstorm asthma expected to return in 2017THUNDERSTORM ASTHMA EXPECTED TO RETURN IN 2017

The Morning Show - Thunderstorm asthma expected to return in 2017. The Daily Edition - Thunderstorm Asthma is an unexpected killer. Better Health Channel - Thunderstorm asthma explained. Professor Christine McDonald

National study offers hope for breathlessnessNATIONAL STUDY OFFERS HOPE FOR BREATHLESSNESS

A national medication study is aiming to help thousands of Australians who struggle every day with shortness of breath

Helping Victorians breathe and sleep easy - A New Centre of Excellence in Respiratory and Sleep MedicineHELPING VICTORIANS BREATHE AND SLEEP EASY - A NEW CENTRE OF EXCELLENCE IN RESPIRATORY AND SLEEP MEDICINE

With your support we will build a life-changing Centre of Excellence in Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, improving quality of life and health outcomes for Victorians who struggle to breathe and sleep

Institute for Breathing and Sleep

Bowen Centre, Austin Hospital
145 Studley Road
Heidelberg, Victoria, 3084

(03) 9496 5390

Email Us

Donate