Personal identity narratives of therapeutic songwriting participants following Spinal Cord Injury: a case series analysis.

AuthorsRoddy, C.
Rickard, N.
Tamplin, J.
Baker, F.A.
TypeJournal Article (Original Research)
JournalThe Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine
PubMed ID28835174
Year of Publication2017
URLhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28835174
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10790268.2017.1364559
Download Personal_identity_narratives_of_therapeutic_songwriting_participants_following_Spinal_Cord_Injury_a_case_series_analysis.pdf (878.2 KB)
AbstractCONTEXT/OBJECTIVE:
Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) patients face unique identity challenges associated with physical limitations, higher comorbid depression, increased suicidality and reduced subjective well-being. Post-injury identity is often unaddressed in subacute rehabilitation environments where critical physical and functional rehabilitation goals are prioritized. Therapeutic songwriting has demonstrated prior efficacy in promoting healthy adjustment and as a means of expression for post-injury narratives. The current study sought to examine the identity narratives of therapeutic songwriting participants.
DESIGN:
Case-series analysis of the individual identity trajectories of eight individuals.
SETTING:
Subacute rehabilitation facility, Victoria, Australia.
PARTICIPANTS:
Eight individuals with an SCI; 7 males and 1 female.
INTERVENTION:
Six-week therapeutic songwriting intervention facilitated by a music therapist to promote identity rehabilitation.
OUTCOME MEASURES:
Identity, subjective well-being and distress, emotional state.
RESULTS:
Three participants demonstrated positive trajectories and a further three showed negative trajectories; remaining participants were ambiguous in their response. Injury severity differentiated those with positive trajectories from those with negative trajectories, with greater injury severity apparent for those showing negative trends. Self-concept also improved more in those with positive trajectories. Core demographic variables did not however meaningfully predict the direction of change in core identity or wellbeing indices.
CONCLUSION:
Identity-focused songwriting holds promise as a means of promoting healthy identity reintegration. Further research on benefits for those with less severe spinal injuries is warranted.

http://www.ibas.org.au/what-we-do/publications/3872928


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